Teaching writing about literature

This Access Center resource is intended to help teachers implement writing instruction that will lead to better writing outcomes for students with and without writing difficulties. We provide research-based recommendations, activities, and materials to effectively teach writing to the wide range of students educators often find in their classrooms.

Teaching writing about literature

Carole Cox Inquiry-based, discovery-focused science instruction is widely viewed as best practice today. Students learn science best when it is integrated with other areas of the curriculum such as reading, language arts, and mathematics. What is inquiry in science instruction?

Scientific inquiry refers to the diverse ways in which scientists study the natural world and propose explanations based on the evidence derived from their work.

Inquiry also refers to the activities of students in which they develop knowledge and understandingof scientific ideas, as well as an understanding of how scientists study the natural world.

They may feel, however, that there are limited resources and time to teach science or have personal and system perceptions of a lack of importance for science teaching in the classroom.

While the NSTA recommends a focus on inquiry-based, discovery-focused instructional approaches to science, this is not the only recommended approach. Teachers can use a range of materials and strategies to teach the skills, knowledge, and abilities addressed in the science standards.

Furthermore, using hands-on learning in science is not a guarantee of inquiry and discovery outcomes, nor is reading and using literature such as nonfiction and narrative books with science information incompatible with inquiry and discovery learning.

Ideally, a teacher would use both approaches, combining observations of the real world, record-keeping, experiments, and other hands-on science activities with literature, to introduce a science topic and for continued research on the topic in the classroom. Both are necessary to build the foundation of a good science program.

In a study of students participating in an experimental group using both science observations and engaging books, Anderson found that the students in this group acquired more conceptual knowledge than other groups not using the combined approach. The NSTA also suggested that students learn science best when it is integrated with other areas of the curriculum such as reading, language arts, and mathematics.

Excellent science trade books are widely available for students K through 8. These are not textbooks, but individual or series books about scientific adventures, biographies of the lives of scientists, and careers in science; they blend factual information about the solar system, living organisms, and the earth with scientific inquiry for students across a range of ages, reading abilities, and interests.

Trade books can be used in science education in several ways: Nonfiction trade books can help children acquire science-related information through a presentation of facts, using a well-organized format and graphics such as photographs, charts, maps, tables, and so on.

For younger students, scientific concepts and information are often presented following a story line, blending fact and fiction and using narrative to pull the facts through a story.

Using a collection of trade books on a science-related topic allows a teacher to integrate a theme-based and a project approach to teaching science. The teacher can introduce a topic of choice that addresses the standards and is appropriate for the grade levelthey are teaching and then build a class collection of books around the topic.

Themes such as Change or the Environment cut across curricular areas, including science. Topics may also emerge during the school year that will be of interest to students.

For example,during hurricane season in Louisiana with a hurricane forming in the Gulf of Mexico, teachers can plan activities using literature as the source of reading and research on extreme weather.

Guidelines for selecting books for teaching science The NSTA publishes a list of "Outstanding Science Trade Books" each year; the books are chosen by a team of science educators who base their decisions on both the content and presentation of each book.

Recently, they have grouped their selections according to the eight categories of the science standards. Their selection is based on the following criteria: The book has substantial science content.

Information is clear, accurate, and up-to-date.

teaching writing about literature

Theories and facts are clearly distinguished.Through a series of writing assignments students in this course will strive to write for love while reflecting on the relationship between wooing-author and swooning-reader. In the Department of Writing, Literature and Publishing, the symbiotic relationship between writing, publishing, and the study of literature becomes a shared experience of finding one’s voice, refining one’s talent, and gaining the skills and knowledge needed to succeed in today’s evolving literary landscape.

teaching writing about literature

In this section you will find practical teaching articles for teachers working in the secondary classroom. From methodology to resources, our articles will help you with your professional development and give you ideas for your teaching practice.

Mentor Texts, 2nd edition: Teaching Writing Through Children's Literature, K-6 second edition Edition. This guide has been written for all A-level modern language teachers, particularly benefit of those with little or no experience of teaching literature. In this section you will find practical teaching articles for teachers working in the secondary classroom.

From methodology to resources, our articles will help you with your professional development and give you ideas for your teaching practice.

Carol Hurst's Children's Literature Site: metin2sell.com